English

WRI 110 Introduction to Composition (3)
Introduction to college writing, with an emphasis on developing the ability to express one’s ideas and personal experiences in a clear and convincing manner. Students receive instruction in the elements of composition (thesis development, paragraphing, and selection and organization of evidence) and hone their ability to identify and repair major grammatical errors. Attention is given to strengthening oral communication and developing vocabulary. Students also receive instruction concerning how to access and use learning resources provided by the university. WRI 110 is for students who would benefit from additional preparation prior to WRI 120, generally those with ACT verbal scores of 20 or lower, or SAT verbal scores of 500 or lower, with final placement based on the results of the SVU writing proficiency test. Students must pass WRI 110 with a C- or better before proceeding to WRI 120 College Composition.

WRI 120 College Composition (GE) (3)
Development of critical thinking skills through reading, writing, and speaking with an emphasis on refining one’s ability to identify, propose, and defend text-based claims. Includes guidance in analytical reading as well as instruction in the writing, editing, and research processes. Students also receive instruction concerning how to access and use learning resources provided by the university. This course is for those students prepared for the rigors of college writing, generally those with a SAT verbal score of 510 or higher or an ACT verbal score of 21 or higher, with final placement based on the results of the SVU writing proficiency test. WRI 120 required for all first-year students, but waived for those scoring 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Test.

WRI 320 Advanced Composition (3)
Students learn to write research-based argument papers with focus on invention, research, synthesis of source material, arrangement, style, mechanics, and adherence to genre and stylistic expectations. Prerequisite: WRI 120 College Composition

ENG 175R Topics in English (3)
Topics in English.

ENG 207 Public Speaking (3)
This course focuses on the principles of public speaking in large and small group environments with emphasis on rhetoric: audience analysis, research and evidence, reasoning, organization, and delivery. The primary aim of this course is to develop students’ strategies for and facility with effective oral communication in a variety of contexts for a variety of purposes and audiences.

ENG 220 Fundamentals of Creative Writing (3)
Fundamentals of writing poetry and fiction; discussion of student work and the creative process; readings in contemporary poems and short stories. Conferences with instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 120.

ENG 225 Approaches to Literature (GE) (3)
This course is designed as a “gateway” course for the English major and minor and introduces students to the academic study of literature and writing about literature that will prepare them to complete the coursework and other requirements of the English program. Students in this course will master the basic language and disciplinary methods of literary criticism, learn to construct analytical arguments that interpret literary texts, primarily through writing and research, and understand the general trends of academic literary study over the last fifty years. Students should also gain a greater appreciation for the power, insight, and beauty of literature through careful study in an academic context.

ENG 230 British Literature I (3)
This course surveys some of the most influential works, authors, trends and traditions of early British literature from Old English through the 18th century with some emphasis on the fluid history of morphing language, cultures, ideas, peoples, and philosophies as evident from its earliest texts in Old English through medieval England and Middle English through Early Modern English and on to the Enlightenment. Works and authors studied include Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Defoe, Pope, and Johnson. Prerequisites: ENG/WRI 120 and ENG 225.

ENG 235 British Literature II (3) This course surveys some of the most influential works of English literature of the 19th and 20th centuries, beginning with the work of William Blake covering three “periods”: Romantic, Victorian, and Modern. Our purpose is to read these works in sequence, focusing on the main authors and their distinguishing characteristics, on developments in genre and style, and to examine the cultural and political contexts of the literature. Some of the authors studied include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Dickens, and Hardy. Prerequisites: ENG 120 and ENG 225.

ENG 240 American Literature (3) This course surveys some of the most influential works, authors, trends, and traditions in American literature from the early colonial period through the present day. Course covers important literary and cultural movements such as Puritanism, Transcendentalism, abolitionist writing, American Realism, Naturalism, the Harlem Renaissance, and Modernism, among others. Some of the authors studied include Bradford, Bradstreet, Taylor, Wheatley, Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Dickinson, Whitman, Twain, Crane, Eliot, James, Wharton, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Roethke, Wilbur, Bishop, Plath, Larkin, Sexton, Moore and Brooks. Prerequisites: ENG/WRI 120 and ENG 225.

ENG 275R Topics in English (3)
Topics in English. Prerequisite: ENG/WRI 120.

ENG 279R Newspaper Staff (1)
Journalism and newspaper production. Students are part of The Paladin staff and contribute to the content and production of the newspaper.

ENG 300 Study Abroad: British Literature (3)
Study of English literature, culture, and historical sites while residing in England. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENG 304 The History of the English Language (3)
This course examines the English language over the 1500-year history of English. We will look at issues of language use, such as the notion of linguistic correctness, the construction of “standard” and “non-standard” English, “literary” language, simplified or plain language, spelling reform, pidgins and creoles, the increasing hegemony of English on a world scale, and the important variations of English around the world. However, before we get to many of those contemporary issues, we will survey the history of English to reveal how these issues have been endemic to English itself. There never was a pure English but only hybrids and transitions. We will begin with some of the basic concepts of language and language change, including semantics (how words mean), phonology (where sounds come from and how they are made), morphology (how words are formed), orthography (spelling), and syntax (how words are put together). From there we will move to the prehistory of English, including the Indo-European language family and where English fits into it. Then we will work chronologically, moving through Old English (before 1100), Middle English (12th-15th centuries), Early Modern English (16th-18th centuries), and Modern English (18th century-present). Along the way, we will realize how historical events such as invasions, revolutions political and intellectual, immigration, emigration and cultural assimilation were shaping forces in the living entity of the language. Grammatical and linguistic terms and ideas will be explained in as much detail as necessary. No previous background in early English is required.

ENG 317 Speaking with Power (3)
Using the fundamentals of Arthur Lessac’s vocal techniques, students will acquire skills in vocal resonance, articulation, and vocal health; they will improve the flexibility, range, and flow of their speaking voices through in-class exercises and exploration and time spent practicing outside of class. Students become educated listeners, able to identify rhetorical devices and nuances of syntax, expression, intent, and meaning. They will engage deeply with text, using techniques developed by Cicely Berry and Andrew Wade.

ENG 320R Intermediate Creative Writing (3)
The writing of poetry and fiction; discussion of student work and the creative process; readings in contemporary short stories and poems. Conferences with instructor. May be repeated for a total of six hours of credit; only three credit hours apply toward English major. Prerequisite: ENG 220.

ENG 321 Modern Usage and Grammar(3)
This course helps students become more alert and intelligent observers (and hence users) of American English, both the spoken and written varieties of the language, and more familiar with the principles of its grammar. In turn, students will be better prepared to evaluate the stylistic and rhetorical choices writers make, both in literary and non-literary texts. This course is also designed to assist students to prepare for editing, publishing, and teaching opportunities by instructing them in American English usage and grammar. Prerequisites: ENG/WRI 120.

ENG 323 Advanced Expository Writing (3)
The writing of nonfiction prose with overview of the essay as a literary genre. Students will read, analyze, and write autobiographical and personal essays, informational, persuasive, and exploratory essays, with focus on voice, purpose, and style. Prerequisite: ENG 120.

ENG 324R Writing Popular Fiction (3)
Students will learn how to write a short story using the techniques of popular fiction genres. The course requires each student to write two short stories, as well as to read and evaluate all the stories written by the other class participants. The instructors will evaluate the stories by professional writing standards. Students must be prepared to hear and learn from constructive criticism of their stories. Prerequisite English 120 and LIB 130 or approval of the instructor.

ENG 325 Literary Theory and Criticism (3)
A study of the primary theories of literature evident in major works of criticism from Plato to the present as well as in contemporary critical practices. Strongly recommended for English majors interested in a teaching career or graduate study in English. Prerequisite: ENG 225.

ENG 327R Writing the Popular Novel (3)
Students will learn how to write a novel using the techniques of popular fiction genres. The course requires each student to write a detailed outline for and approximately 100 pages of a novel. Students must also read an evaluate the students’ work by professional writing standards. Students must be prepared to hear and learn from constructive criticism of their work. Prerequisite 324R, or approval of the instructor.

ENG 330 Genre Studies: Fiction (3)
General introduction to fiction as a literary genre, discussing the development and identifying the range of its diverse formal conventions. Prerequisites: ENG 225 and LIB 130.

ENG 338 How to Read a Film (3)
This is an introductory course in film study emphasizing the form and style of narrative feature films. Previous experience in film studies is not required. Through readings, class discussions, viewing film clips and full-length feature films, examinations, and writing an analysis paper, a student completing this course will learn how to “read” a film by learning to watch knowledgeably and analytically. Students will learn principles of film form and narrative; learn the core elements and techniques of film: mise en scène, cinematography, editing, and sound; develop a core set of analytical tools and vocabulary that will deepen understanding of any film; understand the fundamentals of the technology film depends upon; be introduced to the basics of film history; and, overall gain appreciation of the distinctive aesthetics of film as an art form. Prerequisite: ENG/WRI 120.

ENG 340 Genre Studies: Dramatic Literature (3)
Successful completion of the following (or equivalent as determined by the instructor and registrar): English 120 Freshman Composition; and one course from either LIB 130 Classics of Western Literature; ENG 213 Major Periods; ENG 225 Approaches to Literature; ENG 230 British Lit I; ENG 235 British Lit II; or ENG 240 American Lit.

ENG 341 Playwriting I (3)
Study of dramatic structure, creation of style and technique in playwriting; discipline and practice of the writer. Students complete exercises and writing assignments culminating in an original one-act play. Includes discussion of student work, instructor conferences, and the reading of contemporary plays. Cross-listed with THE 341. Prerequisite: ENG/WRI 120.

ENG 344 Screenwriting (3)
Students learn how to develop and write screenplays, from idea through story and script to notes for rewrite. Through careful study of screenplay writing methods, the reading and viewing of scripts and films, presentations and a short analytical paper, students explore the process of how to write a screenplay, and produce an original feature length script following the advice and formulas of experts in the field of screenwriting. The process of being a writer will also be explored throughout the course. Prerequisite: ENG/WRI 120

ENG 345 Studies in Shakespeare (3)
A study of selected poetic and dramatic works by Shakespeare emphasizing text, performance, and criticism. Prerequisites: ENG/WRI 120 and one from ENG 225, ENG 230, ENG 235, or ENG 240.

ENG 348 Literature and Film (3)
This course will introduce students to the adaptation of literature into films, Films viewed have been adapted from short stories, novels, biography, and plays from a range of texts from the high literary to popular fiction. This course offers a hands-on laboratory experience in adaptation: the paper is an adaptation of a published short story in proper screenplay format, and students collaborate in small groups to produce a film from one of the best of the adapted scripts as voted by the class and the instructor. The film adaptation project includes scripting, casting, costuming, site location, video filming, editing and sound work. Prerequisites: ENG/WRI 120 and ENG 225. ENG 338 recommended.

ENG 350 Genre Studies: Poetry (3)
Course serves as a study of poetry, one of our culture’s finest art forms, and its development in the modern English language (roughly 1500 to the present). Students will work toward cultivating an expertise in reading, interpreting, and writing about poetry, and develop heightened ability to identify and analyze the salient characteristics of individual poems. Prerequisites: ENG/WRI 120 or LIB 130, and one from among ENG 225, ENG 230, ENG 235, or ENG 240.

ENG 365 Writing for Mass Media (3)
Course provides students an opportunity to learn from, and network with, top professionals in the media industry. The goal is to help students visualize the path, skills and knowledge needed to be successful producers of quality nonfiction mass media products. Prerequisite: ENG/WRI 120 and approval of the instructor.

ENG 375R Topics in English (3)
Course provides opportunities for exploration of various topics of especial interest to faculty and students. Course content varies as different topics are selected by the instructor. A representative sampling of topics for past courses include English Romanticism, The Novels of Jane Austen, Tennyson and Browning, American Renaissance, American Modernism, Literature of the North and South, Bible as Literature, Herman Melville, and Visionary Poets. Repeatable with different content. Prerequisites: ENG120 and one from among ENG 225, ENG 230, ENG 235, or ENG 240.

ENG 385R Directed Study in English (3)
Under instructor’s guidance, student pursues topics of personal interest. Prerequisites: ENG 120, 225, and consent of instructor.

ENG 399 Internship/Practicum in English (3)
Internship or practicum in field of potential employment or advanced study. Internship proposal must be approved before registration. Prerequisites: ENG/WRI 120, and two from ENG 225, ENG 230, ENG 235, ENG 240, and consent of instructor.

ENG 420R Advanced Creative Writing (3)
Seminar in creative writing. Seniors concentrate on either poetry or fiction as they work on a substantial body of work. May be repeated for a total of six hours of credit. Prerequisite: ENG 320 or consent of instructor.

ENG 475R Senior Topics in English (3)
This course is usually taught in conjunction with ENG 498 Senior Paper. The course is designed for the advanced student who has already completed the senior paper, or is preparing to do so. All course meeting times, course schedule, texts and subject matter, participation, research and writing expectations are the same as ENG 498 except the paper for the ENG 475 student is shorter. The course focuses on a topic selected by the instructor that is studied in depth. Using primary texts, related readings, class discussions, and engaging in considerable research, students write a substantial critical paper of 12-15 pages in length. Conferences with the instructor guide research, writing and revision. The instructor evaluates the paper using the English senior seminar rubric. Repeatable with different content. Prerequisites: ENG/WRI120 and two from among ENG 225, ENG 230, ENG 235, ENG 240.

ENG 497 Senior Exam for English Majors (0)
This senior is a written exam that covers critical terminology, early and later British literature, American literature, and poetry explication. A passing score is required to graduate. Students register for the senior comprehensive exam in the final semester before graduation, and take the exam in the second half of their final semester.

ENG 498 Senior Paper (3)
Course provides opportunities for exploration of topics of especial interest to faculty and students. Course topics vary from semester to semester. The senior paper is the capstone course and project for the English major. The course focuses on a topic selected by the instructor that is studied in depth. Using primary texts, related readings, class discussions, and engaging in considerable research, students write a substantial critical paper of 20-25 pages. Conferences with the instructor guide research, writing and revision. The instructor evaluates the paper using the English senior paper rubric. Prerequisites: Senior class standing or consent of instructor.

ENG 499 Senior Internship/Practicum in English (3)
Internship or practicum in field of potential employment or advanced study. Internship proposal must be approved before registration. Prerequisites: senior class standing and consent of instructor.